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VACCINATE A CHILD

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VACCINATE A CHILD

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TO SEE A FUTURE WHERE NO WOMAN WILL DIE OF CERVICAL CANCER, WE HAVE TO START EARLY BY GIVING VACCINES TO YOUNG GIRLS AND BOYS

HPV vaccine is an inactivated (not live) vaccine which protects against four major types of HPV.

These include two types that cause about 70% of cervical cancer and two types that cause about 90% of genital warts. HPV vaccine can prevent most genital warts and most cases of cervical cancer.

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Who should get HPV vaccine and when?

  • HPV vaccine is routinely recommended for girls 11 and 12 years of age.  Doctors may give it to girls as young as 9 years
  • The HPV4 vaccine (the type recommended for prevention of genital warts in girls) may also be given in three doses to boys aged 9 to 26.

Why is HPV vaccine given to girls at this age?

It is important for girls to get HPV vaccine before their first sexual contact — because they have not been exposed to HPV.  For these girls, the vaccine can prevent almost 100% of disease caused by the four types of HPV targeted by the vaccine.

Vaccines to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infections are safe and effective….. American Cancer Society

CAN BOYS BE VACCINATED TOO?

HPV Vaccine is Recommended for Boys.

Many people think the HPV vaccine only protects girls, but this vaccine protects boys against certain HPV-related cancers, too!

Girls aren’t the only ones affected by HPV, also known as human papillomavirus. HPV is common in both malesand females.

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What to know if you're debating the risks and benefits of HPV vaccination for your son or daughter.

If you have a child who is at least 9 years old, you may be weighing whether he or she should get vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV).

HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection that can cause genital warts and cervical cancer. Men and women can carry it. HPV sometimes plays a role in other cancers as well, including cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and throat.

There are two HPV vaccines: Gardasil and Cervarix. Gardasil, which protects against four HPV types (6, 11, 16, and 18), is approved by the FDA for use by females aged 9-26 to help prevent cancer of the cervix,vagina, and vulva; genital warts, and anal cancer. It’s also approved for males aged 9-26 to help prevent genital warts and anal cancer.

Cervarix targets HPV types 16 and 18. It’s approved for females aged 10-25 to help prevent cervical cancer.

Both are relatively new vaccines — the FDA approved Gardasil in 2006 and Cervarix in 2009. And that makes some parents uneasy. Should they be, or are their fears unfounded?

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